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Simply Cycling Slovenia 

Amazing Cycling Tours & Holidays in and around Slovenia!

FAQ

1: Who comes on a Simply Cycling Slovenia holiday?

We cater for all ages and abilities, families, single parent families, adult only, groups, couples and singles. Children are also welcome.

 

2: What happens each day?

At breakfast, a member of the SCS team will be available to discuss the route and your plans for the day. You can choose to cycle the standard route or opt to take the longer route. Both will finish at the same place. Your luggage is then loaded into our minibus and taken to the next accommodation.

 

3: How are the rides organised?

On a SCS tour each day you will follow a route which is around 30-40 kilometres, usually finishing at a new venue each evening. There is the option of a longer route for more experienced cyclist which finishes at the same point. You choose how you wish to ride, either with others or just yourselves. In case of difficulties en route SCS assistance is only a phone call away.

 

4: Will I be fit enough?

You do not have to be super fit. As long as you can cycle 30-40 kilometres a day at a leisurely pace, an SCS holiday is for you.

 

5: I am an experienced cyclist; will the routes be long enough for me?

If you want to do more than the average 30-40 kilometres the SCS daily route guide offers a longer or more challenging route. We can discuss this over breakfast. These longer routes are around 70 – 90km and finish at the same point as the standard route.

 

6: What happens if I have a mechanical or other problem on the ride?

Assistance is only a phone call away and our minibus is fully equipped to assist. All bikes come with pump, spare inner tube, water bottle, bike lock and basic toolkit.

 

7: Can I bring my own bike and if so what type of bike?

Yes, no problem. Your bike needs to be suitable for on and off-road riding. Most of the routes are on tarmac cycle ways, but we do go through dirt tracks in the woodlands and along farm tracks.

 

8: What do I wear?

You do not need to spend a fortune on specialist cycle wear. It is up to you what you wear. In May to September it’s usually warm enough to ride in shorts and t-shirts. Cycling shorts with a padded insert are more comfortable than ordinary shorts. Bring with you a lightweight waterproof (preferably breathable). Although wearing a cycle helmet is not a legal requirement we strongly advise that you do wear one and we provide helmets. Sun glasses are advisable along with sun screen lotion.

 

9: What will the weather be like?

The graph below shows the average temperatures both maximum and minimum in Radenci a small town close to the beginning of our cycling trip. Our region has a continental climate characterised by long warm dry summers. However that does include some rain.
weather_chart

10: Where do we stay?

One of the highlights of your holiday will be the attractive hotels and guest-houses in which you stay. They are handpicked for their comfort and individual character and the warmth of their welcome. All rooms have en suite facilities.

 

11. Do you accept credit card payments?

We do not accept credit card payments. However we can take payments via PayPal and you can connect your credit card to your PayPal account. A non refundable deposit of 100€ is required to secure each place on the holiday. The balance must be paid 1 month before the start of the holiday. The balance can also be paid on arrival in cash by prior agreement.

 

12. Can we extend our holiday?

If you would like to stay on in Slovenia after you have finished your cycling holiday then we can make enquiries or arrangements for you.

 

13. Are there cash-point (ATM) facilities?

All towns have banks and supermarkets with cash-points that dispense Euros.

 

14. Will my mobile phone work?

There is excellent network reception but before you leave UK, check that ‘roaming’ or your phone’s equivalent is enabled. If you wish to receive data on your phone, check with your network supplier for a special arrangement. If your phone is unlocked you can purhcase a pay as you go sim card for calls and / or data.

 

15. What happens if I need to see a Doctor?

Medical facilities are excellent and most Doctors and professional medical staff speak English and/or German. If you need to see a Doctor we will take you to a local health Centre. Most speak English. If you are an EU citizen you will need to bring your EHIC (European Health Insurance Card). If you are not from the EU you must bring your health insurance documentation.

 

16. What should we do for lunch & approximately how much does it cost?

During the day, there are two options of ‘when’ to eat. The first is called ‘Malica’, which translates to snack, but is often a bit more substantial than a light bite. Malica is usually served between 10am-12.00pm, though some finish at 11.00am.

The cost of malica varies, but is approximately 4 – 6 Euros per person. Most Slovenes eat malica, as their company must pay for it or give an allowance for it in their wages. The reason it is served so early, is that Slovenes generally start work at 7 or 8am. Some places give you a choice, while others only do one set meal. The malica consists of a soup, bread, salad and main meal.

Following ‘Malice’ is ‘Kosilo’, which is lunch. The kosilo menu is similar to that of the malica, but generally bigger portions and three courses, so finishing with a desert. The average price of kosilo is 10 Euro which is excellent value for money!

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